Why does my Cat Shed all year round?! There is hair everywhere!

In the wild, cats grow hair seasonally. They build up coat in winter and shed in spring and summer to allow air in and cool the body. Due to domestication, breeding, and weather change, many cats shed all year around.

Sometimes this shedding coat gets stuck, with dander and oils, or lack of cleaning. This in turn causes matting and shedding all year around.

In my cat grooming business, my busiest time is usually end of winter, when that winter coat has come in, but there was nowhere to go due to last years’ shedding coat and oils and dander. These cats are matted and the owners have waited as long as they could due to cold. I will usually clip these cats, either all over, or just matting, and recommend a regular prevention groom.

Bathing removes these excess oils and dander, and blow-drying helps separate the hairs and remove this excess undercoat. Bathing regularly can reduce shedding and prevent matting. If excessive shedding persists, or balding patches are present, a change of diet or veterinary treatment may be required.

Are you using the right tools? Some tools do not work effectively, or require to be used a particular way. If you are needing help, seek your Cat Groomers’ advice or see our cat maintenance course on correct tools and use. Many tools I see brought at pet shops have been sold to the wrong coat type or species.

If you would like to learn my Cat Groomers techniques on how to bath and blow-dry your cat effectively and with minimal stress, please see our courses. https://learncatgrooming.com.au

Who am I?

I’m Lexie Goldsmith,

My slow introduction and low stress handling techniques have been proven over 14 years of grooming cats without sedation and many happy clients, being the go-to cat groomer in my state.

I am contacted regularly by people all over the world wanting to learn cat grooming from me, and this makes me excited to see students now grooming cats with my videos, instructions and support.

I am a Qualified Veterinary Nurse, Pet Stylist and Master Cat Groomer, available for your cat grooming education needs.

Come join me on your cat grooming journey, I promise you will not be disappointed, I have a 30day money back guarantee for all courses.

More information on my courses here

Lexie the Cat Groomer Teacher

What I learnt from my first online Grooming Comps!

Want to compete in an online grooming competition and unsure what it’s like?

I have always been one for grooming competitions, whether it’s the buzz of the adrenaline, or the need to improve in all breeds of dogs, being surrounded by like-minded groomers or the gratitude given by the dog owners for choosing their little one. And once they said cats were involved, that’s it! I’m in!

I decided to do one cat and one dog competition.

This is my review over both.

But who knew the online competition could be so different? The stress is of course still there. The want to succeed and not clip or trim the wrong area. Here’s the difference:

Online vs in person

Preparation before the day: I didn’t need to prep the pet every week up until the big week, because really, I could have chosen to groom the pet on any day, in the two months leading up to the competition.

Choice of pet: I didn’t have to worry if they were table shy, scared of big crowds, a squealer, nervous, or, you know, a cat haha. I literally chose the cat that I had time to do pictures of. I don’t have any time between grooms anymore.

The area: I had to move my table, as I work against the wall. Not much needed changing.

The audience: No one watching! This was amazing. And you know what, if you think you have really stuffed that groom (what are critiques for anyway? Improvement.) You could just choose another pet on another day and redo it. Look, I almost decided to do that. My dog was not having a ball that day, and the coat, argh! Puppy coat change is not fun. Then I remembered I was in it to learn and try something new, so I kept going (and grooming around a sick toddler at home probably didn’t help).Of course, I do miss the social aspect.

The timing: You can have as much time as you need (unless competition rules say otherwise).Which is good when you have a sick child you are watching.

The cost: Not having to do free coat preparation grooms, and getting paid for the groom, was a bonus. I’ve never had the guts to charge a client for a competition groom. Also, not losing half or all of your day off, and being absolutely gutted the next day, is so much better!

The wait: The fact that the pet does not have to wait for the other competitors to finish, the judge to go around to everyone, and the judges’ decision making was great. My chosen dog wouldn’t stand there for that long. But… you must wait until the competition closes and the judges have gone over all online entries to receive a critique. This can be up to two months wait, depending on when you complete your entry and the specific competition.

The cats: Finally, a competition for cats! Yay! The only competitions I’ve seen available in-person for cats have been creative (in Australia). I’m not sure if a cat grooming competition is possible, but if there was, I’d be keen! And igroomhub actually does horses too!

Make sure you keep in mind what they are looking for in the winner, this helped me choose what style, length and clients to use.

I will definitely be doing another online competition, hopefully I have more choice of dogs this time, I didn’t give myself enough time to try another breed of dog.

I hope this helped you! I know there is a few competitions still open, such as the Maryland and igroomhub. The NDGANZ Groomalong competition is live and online, so a little different.

Good luck I hope to see you entered one day.

Pictured below my entries!

After all of that, I won Second Place in the Professional Cat Category!

Lexie Goldsmith

https://learncatgrooming.com.au

Want to learn more tips and tricks?

Sign up at https://bit.ly/CGEWLSignup

Who am I?

I’m Lexie Goldsmith,

My slow introduction and low stress handling techniques have been proven over 14 years of grooming cats without sedation and many happy clients, being the go-to cat groomer in my state.

I am contacted regularly by people all over the world wanting to learn cat grooming from me, and this makes me excited to see students now grooming cats with my videos, instructions and support.

I am a Qualified Veterinary Nurse, Pet Stylist and Master Cat Groomer, available for your cat grooming education needs.

Come join me on your cat grooming journey, I promise you will not be disappointed, I have a 30day money back guarantee for all courses.

More information on my courses here

Lexie the Cat Groomer Teacher

Grooming Senior Cats

Senior cats make up the bulk of new enquiries in my salon.

The problem with cats ageing, is that it happens without you even noticing, and then the next thing is the cat is matted!

“Wait, my cats never needed grooming before?!”

Their owners are unaware that cats do require help with grooming, especially as they become older.

Reasons why senior cats require more grooming:

  • Senior cats release more oils in their coat
  • They can become more uncomfortable in everyday life (arthritis) so they are unable to get to the required areas to move these oils and remove undercoat
  • Weight loss or gain
  • Skin and coat changes
  • Build up of nail layers due to less exercise and activity
  • Less exercise (sleeping most of the day)
  • Less self-grooming
  • Dandruff
  • More odour (and a messy behind usually too)
  • Dental issues
  • Underlying health issues
  • Medication side effects

Clipping to remove the matting is a band aid solution. We need to keep on top of this in the long run with bathing, to prevent this from reoccurring. Clipping a senior cat comes with many more risks to the cat. Removing of the excess oils, dandruff and undercoat, and a veterinary consultation to make sure there is nothing else going for the cat is recommended for a happy healthy cat and coat.

There are a few things you need to consider when grooming a senior cat:

Their thin skin! Their skin loses elasticity and is a lot thinner than younger cats. Sometimes it even becomes translucent, and you can see the veins. When grooming the sanitary area, I will always do a 10 blade. Never use a brush on a senior cat. The thinnest skin is in the armpit, anus, ears and groin. Sometimes they are also very underweight, so grooming around a bony figure too.

Possible sensory decline or cognitive disfunction. An older cat may not be able to hear and see as well and can urinate when stressed, as well as startle and lash out. They can become vocal during the groom.

Grooming a senior cat, can be more of a risk when it comes to stress causing death. When stressed, cortisol levels rise, sugar levels rise. The pulse rate will rise. Toxins can be released into the liver and kidneys in extreme stress. Extreme stress can cause urinary blockages and kidney or heart failure, even 24 hours after the stress is removed. Most of the time this risk is less than with sedation, so Vets recommend a Groomer.

It is recommended to do as little as needed to a cat during the groom, so you may choose to clip the cat in two sessions and with the owner present.

A bath and blow-dry in 6 weeks generally can be a lot less stressful for a senior, as less handling, warm water, warm air and massage is used, rather than clipping.

Senior nails can go into the pad when not as active

An example of what it can look like on cats with senior skin. (transparent skin)

Before and after Grooming on a senior cat.

Learn more about grooming senior cats safely and effectively at https://learncatgrooming.com.au

Want to learn more tips and tricks?

Sign up at https://bit.ly/CGEWLSignup

Who am I?

I’m Lexie Goldsmith,

My slow introduction and low stress handling techniques have been proven over 14 years of grooming cats without sedation and many happy clients, being the go-to cat groomer in my state.

I am contacted regularly by people all over the world wanting to learn cat grooming from me, and this makes me excited to see students now grooming cats with my videos, instructions and support.

I am a Qualified Veterinary Nurse, Pet Stylist and Master Cat Groomer, available for your cat grooming education needs.

Come join me on your cat grooming journey, I promise you will not be disappointed, I have a 30day money back guarantee for all courses.

More information on my courses here

Lexie the Cat Groomer Teacher

Stud tail- Ew!

That icky greasy looking section of the tail that removes from the beauty of your cat or client’s luscious tail. It can be just oily, black, or scaly, I have an easy home remedy that works for my grooming clients that is reachable (and in your pantry). Ok, I literally stole mine from my pantry and haven’t put it back!

See before and after photos below

What is stud tail?

A cat has a gland that secretes oils on its tail and this is commonly called ‘stud tail’ (Supracaudal gland) as mostly seen in entire (un de-sexed) male cats to secrete scents. It may show baldness, flaky skin, oils, blackheads or thinning hair.

The Stud tail will need extra shampoos but you will never be able to remove completely. When drying the cat, you will notice that this patch still looks ‘wet’, this is the coat oils.

When the stud tail look like open wounds, or more than just a little crusty, please to not over wash as you may cause more problems and advise the owner to get it checked by their vet.” Extract from bathing the feline, one of my professional cat grooming online courses.

Help! How do I remove stud tail? That icky tail grease!

You may use a few ways to reduce stud tail. It is impossible to remove completely, and being a natural part of a cat, I wouldn’t recommend scrubbing away.

Degreasing method: You may try using strong degreasing agents such as ‘Groomers Goop’ (oil based) or ‘Progroom degreasing gel’, but do not do more than two applications, as you can do harm when washing possibly open skin.

Conditioning method: Oil removes oil, right? So using a concentrated conditioner may help remove the oils, then shampoo and condition again.

Soaking up the oils: I have found using corn starch (corn flour) prior to, or instead or a bath, to work very well. Here is my technique below:

Step one: Separate hairs and add the corn starch, using lots! Work it in with your fingers.

Step two: Allow to sit for 5 minutes.

Step three: Using a pin brush, brush excess out, carefully and fluffing up the coat to remove all remnants.

Step four: If possible, hold the tip and shake the tail lightly, so there is no corn starch left. You may then proceed to wash the cat as normal. I found this can keep stud tail from the coat from 1-4 weeks depending on how quickly the body secretes oils. This is a gentler approach for the skin, remembering, what we put in the skin, absorbs into the body, so I prefer to avoid harsh chemicals.

This easy approach can be done at home by anyone, and it’s cheap! 🙂

Before

During

After

Want to learn more tips and tricks?

Sign up at https://bit.ly/CGEWLSignup

Who am I?

I’m Lexie Goldsmith,

My slow introduction and low stress handling techniques have been proven over 14 years of grooming cats without sedation and many happy clients, being the go-to cat groomer in my state.

I am contacted regularly by people all over the world wanting to learn cat grooming from me, and this makes me excited to see students now grooming cats with my videos, instructions and support.

I am a Qualified Veterinary Nurse, Pet Stylist and Master Cat Groomer, available for your cat grooming education needs.

Come join me on your cat grooming journey, I promise you will not be disappointed, I have a 30day money back guarantee for all courses.

More information on my courses here

Lexie the Cat Groomer Teacher

What do I need to start Cat Grooming?

What equipment do I need to start Cat Grooming?

Whether you are starting out in Cat Grooming, or adding to your services, here is the list of what I recommend in a basic Cat Grooming Kit.

Clipping:

High Non-slip table

A5 blade type clippers (eg. Heiniger Saphir Clipper, Wahl Km10 or Oster Pro 3000i)

Steel blade/s: #10 (7F if ceramic not available)

Ceramic Blade/s: #7F (3F or 4F if looking at teddy clips in future)

Mini Trimmers or #30 blade for pads (eg. Heiniger Mini, Wahl Bravura Mini, Shear Magic mini)

Short 6inch thinning scissors for around head, tops of feet

Non-scented baby wipes

Small Dog Nail Clippers

Clipper oil spray and disinfectant

Veterinary Elizabethan Collar (easy to snap on/off type)

First Aid kit

Greyhound comb

Cat Comb (gripsoft fine comb)

Shedding Comb (Gripsoft shedding comb)

Mini Persian type comb

Bathing

Shampoo Dilution Bottles

Cat/Clarifying Shampoo (Progroom Xtra Clean, Petway Clarifying, Secret Weapon Apple Cider Vinegar)

Shower hose

Happy Hoodie/Show tech ear buddy

Large bath sheets (towels) for wrapping

Dryer with an adjustable dial (eg. Lanton, Shernbao Cyclone, Aelous Cyclone.)

Small Nail Clippers

Greyhound Comb

Pin Brush

Shedding Comb

To see a full list, see my online Professional Courses Bathing the Feline, and Clipping the Feline.

Ew! Dandruff!


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Have you noticed flakes on your cat?

Like someone has sprinkled salt on your kitty?

Dandruff can affect any cat. Dandruff is the build-up of dead skin, known as seborrhoea sicca. It happens when the skin produces more skin flakes than usual, or they are not being moved by grooming.

Before trying to address the issue, it is recommended to check with a vet that there is no underlying skin condition or health issue. An ill cat will also reduce self-grooming. Dandruff is most common on overweight and elderly cats and more obvious on dark haired cat. Sometimes a groomer will find excess dandruff in your cat that you cannot see due to your cat’s coat or length, it may be there, so regular grooming and checking of skin is best for cat’s optimal coat and skin health.

There are many things you can do that may decrease dandruff in your cat.

  • Make sure your cat is on a high-quality diet with omega 3 fatty acids
  • Put your cat on a weight loss diet (this will also benefit in other ways)
  • Regularly brush/comb your cat to move dead skin.
  • Bath your cat if excess oils and dandruff are seen. This will be especially helpful for overweight or elderly cat.
  • Keep up with parasite prevention, as fleas, mites and lice can contribute to dandruff.
  • Have your cat checked by a dermatology vet if symptoms persist, hair loss, or itching is present.

Why Cats Groom

Studies show that cats spend 8% of their waking life engaged in grooming behaviour. There are at least four good reasons why:

  • Parasite control
  • Removal of dead hair: when cats don’t groom well, the old hair builds up and the coat gets matted
  • Removal of dirt and oils: cats are also literally cleaning themselves, which is also why toxins on the coat are dangerous. We have the ability to help with this by regular bathing and grooming.
  • Maintenance of insulation: that clumping compacted coat can’t keep your cat warm or cool like a shiny, smooth coat

Grooming isn’t just something to keep busy. It’s a highly complex, programmed and essential feline behaviour. So the next time you see your cat grooming, remember this: not only is it essential, it’s also a sign of your cat’s wellbeing. You can help your cat too!

See in picture- white dandruff being removed during washing.

 

Want to learn how to groom your cat at home comfortable and efficiently?

See our courses

Resource: Walkerville Vet | Adelaide Veterinary Clinic | Preschool & Blog, Pawsitively Divine grooming photo

Lexie the Cat Groomer Teacher

 

Winter Cat Grooming

You may think that cat’s don’t need grooming in winter, when in fact they may need more grooming!

The end of winter, my phone rings off the hook, as many cat owners have matted cats.

Why is this?

Because they have been matting for the whole of winter and have been putting off clipping their cat because of the cold meanwhile, matting gets tighter and spreads the longer you wait.

Let’s look at the life cycle of the cat’s hair shaft.

  • Anagen – This is the active growing phase of the hair.
  • Catagen – This phase signals the end of the active growing phase, hair growth slows down.
  • Telogen – The resting phase of the hair cycle.
  • Exogen – Shedding phase.

Before winter, a cat’s coat is built up for protection and warmth. If the cat has not had the undercoat from spring/summer shedding removed, and has a clean coat and room for undercoat to grow into, the cat’s coat will start to mat. During winter 70% of the primary hairs and 90% of secondary hairs, are in resting phase (not shedding), hence the large amount of coat. This also explains why they shed such large amounts, as these Telogen (resting) hairs must become shedding hairs.

The cold wet air also can add to the likelihood of a cat matting, touching the wet grass, can cause parts of the cat to mat. If the cat becomes wet, it must be dried properly, and the coat separated to prevent matting. Just like our hair, if we are to wet it, and let it dry without combing/brushing, the hairs group and cause knots. Wet hair not dried properly, like with dogs, can cause bacteria to grow at the skin.

So in short, cat’s need their undercoat regularly combed out, and prevent medium to long hair cats getting wet outside, if they do, comb them as they dry to let air in and separate the hairs.

Want to learn more about matting prevention and removing undercoat?

See my courses:

Professional: Bathing the Feline, Clipping the Feline.

Cat owner courses: Short hair coat maintenance course, Long hair coat maintenance course.

Want to learn more tips and tricks?

Sign up at https://bit.ly/CGEWLSignup

Who am I?

I’m Lexie Goldsmith,

My slow introduction and low stress handling techniques have been proven over 14 years of grooming cats without sedation and many happy clients, being the go-to cat groomer in my state.

I am contacted regularly by people all over the world wanting to learn cat grooming from me, and this makes me excited to see students now grooming cats with my videos, instructions and support.

I am a Qualified Veterinary Nurse, Pet Stylist and Master Cat Groomer, available for your cat grooming education needs.

Come join me on your cat grooming journey, I promise you will not be disappointed, I have a 30day money back guarantee for all courses.

More information on my courses here

Lexie the Cat Groomer Teacher

Am I ready to add Cat Grooming to my business?

Short answer Yes, long answer yes.

6 signs you are ready to add Cat Grooming services to your salon


1. You know an employee who is keen, or you are keen, to learn Cat Grooming. And enjoy the company of cats!


2. Your business has clients that also own cats. Survey your clients, there is already so much more income sitting there. And an existing client is more likely to have their cat groomed at your salon, as they already have a relationship with you/your groomers!


3. You have the ability to separate dog and cat clients (by timing or area)

4. You have a safe area to groom a cat free from escape and risks.


5. You’d like to double you or your employees per hour output. (Not forgetting there’s a reason it costs more!)


6.. You have the tools required: High bath, dryer, table, greyhound combs, clarifying shampoos, clippers, blades.

Want to learn more?

Learn Cat Grooming at learncatgrooming.com.au

Want to learn more tips and tricks?

Sign up at https://bit.ly/CGEWLSignup

Who am I?

I’m Lexie Goldsmith,

My slow introduction and low stress handling techniques have been proven over 14 years of grooming cats without sedation and many happy clients, being the go-to cat groomer in my state.

I am contacted regularly by people all over the world wanting to learn cat grooming from me, and this makes me excited to see students now grooming cats with my videos, instructions and support.

I am a Qualified Veterinary Nurse, Pet Stylist and Master Cat Groomer, available for your cat grooming education needs.

Come join me on your cat grooming journey, I promise you will not be disappointed, I have a 30day money back guarantee for all courses*.

More information on my courses here

Why is cat grooming so costly?

There are so many reasons why a Cat Groom is at a high rate:

  • Cat Grooming is a specialised animal care field, and should be treated as a specialty.
  • Sedation and a shave at a vet is double, if not more, the cost than using a no sedation Cat Groomer, (when really the risk is higher for the Cat Groomer)
  • Cat Groomers are working with unpredictable domesticated tigers
  • If a Groomer becomes bitten, and it leads to infection, they are out of work for at least a week!
  • Cats have nails, teeth and ninja moves, and they know this!
  • Cats are sit and wait predators, and can launch at any time, we must learn to predict a cats movement with body language (such an important skill by continuing education such as my behaviour course 😉 )
  • Clipping, especially without sedation, has a high risk of cutting a cats fine tissue-paper-like skin. it takes skills and precision. You cannot just pick up a pair of clippers!
  • Have you seen the amount of shampoo (and water) it takes to bath a cat properly? Cats fur repels water and liquids, they don’t want to be clean.
  • The amount of electricity used to get through a matted coat and dry a thick coat such as a Maine Coon. As much as grooming a large dog!
  • and sharp strong equipment. The amount of pet owners that say they brought clippers and after one clip had to stop half way and had blunted their clippers

A Cat Groomer is worth their weight in gold! Value your Cat Groomer. They risk it all for their love of Cats.

https://learncatgrooming.com.au/p/behaviour

Below some lovely at home grooming pics:

Want to learn more tips and tricks?

Sign up at https://bit.ly/CGEWLSignup

Who am I?

I’m Lexie Goldsmith,

My slow introduction and low stress handling techniques have been proven over 14 years of grooming cats without sedation and many happy clients, being the go-to cat groomer in my state.

I am contacted regularly by people all over the world wanting to learn cat grooming from me, and this makes me excited to see students now grooming cats with my videos, instructions and support.

I am a Qualified Veterinary Nurse, Pet Stylist and Master Cat Groomer, available for your cat grooming education needs.

Come join me on your cat grooming journey, I promise you will not be disappointed, I have a 30day money back guarantee for all courses.

More information on my courses here

Lexie the Cat Groomer Teacher

Why do we wash cats?

You say: ‘I have never bathed my cat before, my cat is fine just licking itself clean?’

“Cat coats secrete oils naturally for both protection from elements and survival in the wild. Some cats can oversecrete oils due to skin issues, breed, and age. A build up of oils can cause matting, smell and skin issues.

Coats also produce dander and dandruff naturally, this is what humans are usually allergic to.

Cats produce undercoat, which is guided by the temperature, age, coat type and amount of daylight. If this undercoat is not brushed out, it can be stuck in the oils, and subsequently shed all year around. Cats are meant to lick and remove this themselves, which can cause hairballs, and in worse case scenarios, hair masses in the stomach.

Washing properly removes excess oils, dander, dandruff and undercoat.

There is a lot more to the cat coat than meets the eye.

The fur of a cat also includes items such as dander, dead skin, salivary crystals, faecal matter, released undercoat, skin oils, flea dirt, bacteria and fungi.

Cats secrete oils to avoid the skin getting wet. These oils can build up causing the undercoat and dander to get stuck, causing matting. A cat licks itself to move these oils around and remove the dandruff and dander. They spread around the saliva, faecal matter and debris.

The main debris that people are allergic to is the dander and saliva of the cat, and so to prevent allergies thorough bathing is essential.

Drying is also important to separate the hairs letting in air, releasing the undercoat and any left-over dander. If you do not dry your cat, the cat will then need to lick itself dry, causing the allergens to spread again. This undercoat will instead go into the stomach.”

Extract from Bathing the feline for professionals.

In summary, cat’s shed seasonally, bathing, blow-drying and combing helps reduce matting, as when the new coat grows, it will not become stuck causing knots and compaction. Bathing also reduces the allergen Fel-D.

Read about just one case of hair compaction: Hero’s big hairball – Fur balls in Cats – Perth Cat Hospital

See my slow introduction technique for your cat to enjoy at home grooming, and you how may groom at home effectively like a professional, at https://bit.ly/catownershome

Short hair Coat Maintenance Course

Long hair Coat Maintenance Course


Want to learn more tips and tricks?

Sign up at https://bit.ly/CGEWLSignup

Who am I?

I’m Lexie Goldsmith,

My slow introduction and low stress handling techniques have been proven over 14 years of grooming cats without sedation and many happy clients, being the go-to cat groomer in my state.

I am contacted regularly by people all over the world wanting to learn cat grooming from me, and this makes me excited to see students now grooming cats with my videos, instructions and support.

I am a Qualified Veterinary Nurse, Pet Stylist and Master Cat Groomer, available for your cat grooming education needs.

Come join me on your cat grooming journey, I promise you will not be disappointed, I have a 30day money back guarantee for all courses.

More information on my courses here

Lexie the Cat Groomer Teacher